The New York Bar Exam is a two-day exam
-- Tuesday and Wednesday
-- with the New York essays and MPT on Tuesday and the multiple-choice Multistate Bar Exam on Wednesday.

First Day (Tuesday) morning session 9:00am - 12:15pm:
* 3 hours, 15 minutes
* Three Essay Questions (approximately 40 minutes per essay)
* 50 New York Multiple-Choice (NYMC) questions (approximately 1.5 minutes per question)

First Day (Tuesday) afternoon session 1:45pm - 4:45pm:
* 3 hours
* One 90-minute Multistate Performance Test (MPT)
* Two Essay Questions (approximately 45 minutes per essay)

Second Day (Wednesday) morning session 9am - 12pm:
* 3 hours
* Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)
* 100 Multiple-Choice questions

Second Day (Wednesday) afternoon session 1:30pm - 4:30pm:
* Three hours
* Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)
* 100 Multiple-Choice questions

Grading of the New York Bar Exam: A final total weighted scaled score of 665 is required to pass the examination, and any applicant who fails to attain a total weighted scaled score of 665 must retake the entire examination at a subsequent administration. There is no appeal from the final total weighted scaled score.

The answers to the five essay questions and the MPT are each graded in accordance with a predetermined marking formula, and the grades attained by the applicant on the respective questions are the raw essay scores. The total number of questions answered correctly by an applicant on the 50 New York multiple choice questions is the raw score for that portion, and the number of questions answered correctly on the MBE questions is the applicant's raw score for the MBE portion.

Through psychometrically approved scaling procedures, the raw scores attained by the applicants on each portion of the examination are converted to scaled scores on a common scale of 0 to 1000, and the three scaled scores are then weighted and combined to yield total weighted scaled scores on the same 0 to 1000 scale. The relative weights assigned are 50% to the written portion (40% essays and 10% MPT), 10% to the New York multiple choice, and 40% to the MBE portion.

The essay and MPT answers of each applicant who receives an initial total weighted scaled score of 655 through 664 are re-read and re-graded by graders other than the initial graders. The two scaled scores for each essay answer are averaged to determine a final scaled score for each essay. The examination scores are then recomputed to determine each applicant's final scaled score. There is no appeal from this final score.

There is no passing or failing on any one portion of the examination. Thus, a poor performance on one section of the examination may be offset by a superior performance on another section. Passing or failing is determined only on the basis of the applicant's total weighted scaled score.

Transfer of MBE Score from another jurisdiction to New York: Please note that effective August 1, 2010, the Board no longer accepts the transfer of MBE scores earned from a prior administration of the MBE in another jurisdiction.

An applicant taking the New York bar examination and a concurrent bar examination in another jurisdiction shall have the option to take the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) in the other jurisdiction on the same day that such examination is given in New York, and the MBE scale score attained in such other jurisdiction will be combined with the applicant's scores on the New York section of the examination in the same manner as if the applicant had taken the MBE in New York.

An applicant who elects to use an MBE score from another jurisdiction as permitted above shall notify the Board of such election at the time that the application to sit for the New York State bar examination is filed, and shall make the arrangements to have such score timely transferred to New York.

To transfer a concurrent MBE score to New York from another jurisdiction the applicant must complete the MBE score transfer form available on the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE) and pay the prescribed NCBE score transfer fee, or, if the other jurisdiction transfers its own MBE scores, follow the procedures outlined by the other jurisdiction. The transferred MBE score must be received in the Boardís office no later than April 1 following a February examination, and no later than October 1 following a July examination. It shall be the applicantís responsibility to ensure that the Board receives the report of the transferred MBE score in a timely manner. Failure to timely transfer an MBE score to the Board shall result in the nullification of an applicantís bar examination scores.

MBE scores transferred from another jurisdiction will not be reported to candidates who are successful on the New York State bar examination.

An applicant who elects to use an MBE score from another jurisdiction as permitted above shall notify the Board of such election at the time that the application to sit for the New York State bar examination is filed, and shall make the arrangements to have such score timely transferred to New York.

Transfer of MBE Score Earned in New York to Other Jurisdictions. As set forth in Board Rule 6000.6(g)(2), an applicant taking the bar examination in New York may request the certification of an MBE score earned in New York to another jurisdiction. An applicant requesting certification of an MBE score earned in New York to another jurisdiction must direct such request to the Boardís office on a form provided by the Board and pay the prescribed fee as defined in Board Rule 6000.3(c).

Admission on Motion: New York State permits admission on motion, without examination, for applicants who have practiced for five of the preceding seven years, are admitted to practice in at least one reciprocal jurisdiction, and have graduated from an American Bar Association approved law school. The first step in applying for admission is to obtain a Certificate of Legal Education from our Board. The fee for such certification is $400. New York has reciprocity with the following states:

Alaska
Arkansas
Colorado
District of Columbia
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

** NEW 50 HOUR PRO BONO REQUIREMENT -- POSTED SEPT 19, 2012

Beginning in January 2013, a new rule affecting bar admission in New York will be in effect. All candidates seeking admission after January 1, 2015, with the exception of admission on motion candidates, will need to file documentation showing that they have completed 50 hours of qualifying pro bono work, as required by Rule 520.16 of the Rules of the Court of Appeals. For further information regarding the implementation and requirements of the new rule, along with Frequently Asked Questions, please visit Pro Bono Bar Admission Requirements. The FAQs contain information on the web address and toll free telephone number in the event that you have an inquiry.